2019 Aurealis Awards shortlist

from the Aurealis Awards blog

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We all need a bit of joy in our lives right now, so it is with great pleasure we present the Aurealis Awards finalists for 2019. Congratulations to all the finalists, and a huge thanks to our panelists who have persevered through fire, flood and plague to deliver these shortlists, which contain a glorious diversity of work for your delectation. It’s a really important time to support your local creators, so if you are able, go hunt down some great reads today! — Tehani

 

BEST FANTASY NOVEL
Angel Mage, Garth Nix (Allen & Unwin)
Darkdawn, Jay Kristoff (HarperCollins Publishers)
The Wailing Woman, Maria Lewis (Little, Brown Book Group)
The Harp of Kings, Juliet Marillier (Macmillan Australia)
The Darkest Bloom,  P M Freestone (Scholastic)
Graveyard Shift in Ghost Town, Michael Pryor (Allen & Unwin)

BEST SCIENCE FICTION NOVEL
The Subjects, Sarah Hopkins (Text Publishing)
Aurora Rising, Amie Kaufman & Jay Kristoff (Allen & Unwin)
The Trespassers, Meg Mundell (UQP)
The Year of the Fruit Cake, Gillian Polack (IFWG Publishing Australia)
The Glad Shout, Alice Robinson (Affirm Press)
Daughter of Bad Times, Rohan Wilson (Allen & Unwin)

 

More details in other categories here: 

 

Crit Mass goes online April 1st!

For obvious reasons, Critical Mass will conduct the next few meetings online, via Zoom (which can be used on desktop, laptop or smart phone).

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Our special guest for the April 1st Meeting is Karen J Carlisle, local author of The Adventures of Viola Stewart, The Aunt Enid Mysteries and The Department of Curiosities series. Hopefully, she’ll treat us with details of her latest work.

 

The meeting will start at 7pm (Adelaide time, 30 mins later in Melbourne ), run for 40 mins, then take a 10-minute tea/coffee/G&T break and re-convene at 7:50 (Adelaide time) for the final half hour.

To join the meeting, you will need to provide the following information to zoom*:
Join Zoom Meeting at 7pm:
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/242593495
Meeting ID: 242 593 495

Join meeting at 7:50pm:
https://us04web.zoom.us/j/130077258
Meeting ID: 130 077 258

Please note the different meeting ID for part 2 of the meeting

*If you need some guidance in using zoom, here’s a useful video on joining meetings:
https://support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362193-Joining-a-Meeting 

Virtual Worldcon

This year’s 78th World Science Fiction Convention, CoNZealand–which includes the Hugo Awards—won’t take place as an in-person event this summer, because of the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. In its place, organizers will set up a virtual convention for fans to attend.

CoNZealand’s organizers explained that they had a couple of options for the convention: to shift the date later this year, to cancel the convention altogether, or to move it online, much like the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America recently announced would happen with the upcoming Nebula Conference.

The strong belief that we can put on a great Worldcon has led us to the decision to make CoNZealand a virtual convention. Our Tech Division is confident they can deliver a virtual Worldcon and are excited about the possibilities.

The Fallen Doctor

Chris Chibnall has shared a short story on the Doctor Who site that reveals the specifics of the Doctor’s post-regeneration survival. The story “Things She Thought While Falling” reads like a flavor document meant to help Whittaker internalize the then-new Doctor’s voice:

That’s interesting, she thought. I seem to be an optimist. With a hint of enthusiasm. And what’s that warm feeling in my stomach? Ah, I’m kind! Brilliant.

Last and First Men

One the most emotional world premieres at the upcoming 2020 Berlin International Film Festival is bound to be “Last and First Men,” the directorial feature debut of the late Icelandic composer Jóhann Jóhannsson.[…]

Jóhannsson’s only directorial feature, “Last and First Men” is an adaptation of his touring multimedia project of the same name. The movie — shot on 16mm black-and-white film with “Victoria” and “Rams” cinematographer Sturla Brandth Grøvlen — played in concert halls, accompanied by Jóhannsson’s score with a live orchestra. The feature film playing at Berlin includes the composer’s original score and narration from Tilda Swinton….

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— from Mike Glyer’s file770.com

Crit Mass Mar 4th: the Night Watch series

This month, Roman looks at the novels in the best-selling russian series by Sergei Lukyanenko. What started as a trilogy is now a hexology, but he’s just looking a the setup in the first two novels: Night Watch and Day Watch. Some of you might recall the movies based on the novels…

It’s 6:45 Wed 4th March for a 7pm start at kappy’s tea & coffee merchants,
22 Compton St,Adelaide.
Come along and tell us about your favourite stand-alone fantasy story!

Stand alone fantasy novels

City-of-Bones

City of Bones by Martha Wells

Martha Wells has recently entered the spotlight with her delightful, award-winning science fiction novella All Systems Red, but she’s also got a fabulous backlist. City of Bones wars with Death of the Necromancer for my favorite Martha Wells novel, but City of Bones undoubtedly wins the place of “Best Standalone by Martha Wells.”

— Sarah Waites, in her list of 10 standalone Fantasy Novels on Tor.com

Original Illustrations From Jules Verne’s Voyages Extraordinaires

Jules Verne was a ridiculously prolific author, publishing more than 90 novels, short stories, non-fiction books, essays, and plays over his 50-odd year career. His magnum opus was the Voyages Extraordinaires, a series of 54(!) novels that sought “to outline all the geographical, geological, physical, and astronomical knowledge amassed by modern science and to recount, in an entertaining and picturesque format…the history of the universe.”

[…]

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From Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Alphonse de Neuville and Édouard Riou)

But it wasn’t just Verne’s inventive prose that captivated 19th century audiences. The Voyages Extraordinaires also included plenty of lavish illustrations, most in black-and-white, depicting each protagonist’s globetrotting adventures.

Thanks to the work of the late Verne scholar Dr. Zvi Har’El, you can peruse all of the original illustrations online.

— more details at Tor.com